Ossobuco Alla Milanese, Veal Shank Milanese Style

 

Together with cotoletta (veal breaded cutlet), yellow risotto (Italian rice with saffron) and cassoeula (meat stew), ossobuco is one of the most typical dishes that not only holds its origins in the Lombard capital of Milan, but is in fact representative of the city. Let’s take a look at what’s in it and how to make it. Ossobuco in Italian literally means “bone with a hole”, which is in other words, veal shank. It is a meat cut that corresponds to the leg muscle, more specifically, the shin. It is usually cross-cut into sections that are about 4cm thick and as the name states, consist of a meat with a bone marrow in the middle, which gives the veal a delicious additional flavor as it cooks. The best and most common shanks are from veal and beef, but can also come from turkey, although far less tasty. The Milanese cuisine is certainly the one that most exalts the ossobuco, making it a succulent traditional dish of the Belpaese. In order to make it, you just need to follow a few easy steps –the meat is stewed, seasoned in the classic gremolata with chopped parsley, garlic and lemon zest. The most classical recipe accompanies the dish with the traditional Milanese saffron risotto. Italian Traditions introduces you to the dish that won Italian dish of the year in 2012 at the fifth edition of the International Day of Italian Cuisines!

Ingredients (4 servings)

4 pieces of veal shank 3cm thick, cut from the lower part where the bone is small and only filled with marrow, and not spongy

White flour

50 g of butter

¼ of an onion, chopped

A ladle of broth

A small, fresh tomato, peeled and chopped

Salt

For the gremolata (seasoning)

Lemon zest

Half a clove of garlic

1 anchovy

A handful of chopped parsley leaves


Directions

In a skillet, sauté the onion in butter, then add the lightly floured ossobuchi. Brown it on both sides, turning it without pricking it. Pour a bit of broth, the tomato (in small quantities), and the salt, covering the skillet. Let it cook on low heat for about an hour and a half, until the shank acquires a slightly glossy appearance. Five minutes before serving it, add the lemon zest, parsley, garlic and anchovy. Mix well and serve with risotto alla Milanese.